The initiative will be officially launched at the 26th Conference of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, which will be held in November in Glasgow.

Another 24 countries, including Germany, France, and Japan, have announced their intention to join the U.S. and EU initiatives to reduce methane emissions into the atmosphere by at least 30% by 2030 compared to 2020 levels. This follows from a joint statement issued by Washington and Brussels on Monday by the Department of State.

The relevant initiative was announced in September. Then, in addition to the U.S. and the EU, it was supported by seven other countries. “After Argentina, Ghana, Indonesia, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the United Kingdom declared their support from the very beginning; another 24 countries announced that they would join [the initiative],” the message says. Among these 24 States, the statement indicates Germany, Israel, Canada, Kyrgyzstan, France, and Japan. Thus, the document notes that 9 out of 20 countries are now participating in the initiative, which accounts for the bulk of methane emissions. In addition, more than 30 countries that supported the initiative account for 60% of global GDP and about 30% of global methane emissions.

The initiative will be officially launched at the 26th Conference of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP-26), which will be held in November in Glasgow. The U.S. and the EU expect to attract other countries to participate in the initiative by this time. “The successful implementation of the initiative will reduce [global] warming by at least 0.2 degrees Celsius by 2050,” the U.S. and EU said in a joint statement.