He was charged for failing to attend congressional hearings and for refusing to provide the documents required of him.

Stephen Bannon, a former aide to the 45th President of the United States Donald Trump, will appear in court on Monday in a case of criminal contempt of Congress. Such an accusation was brought against him by a grand jury because of his refusal to appear at a hearing in a special committee of the lower house of Congress, which is investigating the circumstances of the storming of the Capitol on January 6.

CNN, citing sources, reported on Friday that Bannon will voluntarily appear in court on November 15. His case was transferred to the judge of the Metropolitan District of Columbia, Carl Nichols, who was appointed to this position by Trump in 2019.

Earlier on Friday, the U.S. Department of Justice announced that the former presidential aide was charged for failing to attend congressional hearings and for refusing to provide the documents required of him. On each of the two counts, Bannon could face from 30 days to one year in prison and a fine of $100 to $1 thousand.

In October, the Democrat-controlled lower house of the U.S. legislature passed a resolution to hold Bannon accountable for contempt of Congress after he refused to appear at a hearing. Refusal to comply with the requirement of legislators to appear at the hearing on the agenda is considered in the United States a manifestation of disrespect for Congress and can be interpreted in court as a criminal offense. However, the decision on whether to initiate a case against Trump’s ex-aide could only be made by the Ministry of Justice.