An international experimental group first discovered neutrinos using the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

The authors of the new paper from the University of California at Irvine published a paper on how they observed six neutrino interactions. This happened during the pilot launch of a compact emulsion detector that was installed at the LHC.

Neutrinos are difficult to detect, because these electrically neutral elementary particles are very light and rarely interact with particles of matter. However, they are very common.

Prior to this project, no signs of neutrinos were observed at the collider. This is a major breakthrough and a step towards a thorough study of neutrinos.

Jonathan Feng, professor of physics and astronomy at the University of California, Los Angeles

As part of the experiment, the authors of the new work placed the FASER device at a distance of 480 m from the place of collision of particles. Its principle of operation is similar to that of a film camera.

FASER consists of lead and tungsten plates, which are separated by layers of emulsion. When neutrinos hit the nuclei of dense metal atoms, other particles are created that pass through the emulsion.

This was a test run of the device, and it proved to be effective. Now we are going to prepare a new device that will be larger and more sensitive.

Jonathan Feng, professor of physics and astronomy at the University of California, Los Angeles

A new, more powerful device, which will be called FASERnu, will be able to find neutrinos even more often, as well as distinguish between its types, namely, electron, muon and tau neutrinos, as well as antineutrinos.

The authors are confident that from 2022 they will detect more than 10 thousand neutrino interactions, and they will also be able to find the most high-energy neutrino of those that were not created in space.