The dismissals were another blow to the Russian international broadcasting network, which this year intended to launch a new German-language version of RT.

Ruptly, a Russian state news agency based in Berlin, faced a massive outflow of employees after the Russian invasion of Ukraine. This is stated in the exclusive material of the Reuters agency.

At the disposal of Reuters was a recording of an editorial meeting during which employees complained that they, among other things, were not allowed to talk about the Russian invasion. The Kremlin calls its actions in Ukraine a “special operation” and requires local media to use this term.

Ruptly Content Director Ekaterina Mavrenkova urged employees not to get hung up on the exact wording.

“All the words we used do not distort reality in any way,” she says on the recording, which was obtained by Reuters. “Given all these linguistic subtleties, there are ways to present the picture objectively without supporting either side.”

Reuters sent a request for comment to the email address listed on the website, but received an automatic response.

“As of February 25, 2022, I am no longer working as a marketing director at Ruptly,” Sean Lynn’s automated response reads.

Founded in 2013 to provide news to the Russian state-owned international broadcaster RT and other clients, Ruptly provides video and live broadcasts from around the world.

At least three senior editors of the agency quit earlier, said a Ruptly employee who wished to remain anonymous. One of them, the head of the planning department, Katerina Alexandridi, confirmed her departure to Reuters.

“Some of our colleagues are leaving,” General Director Dinara Toktosunova said during the editorial meeting. –For the time being, we will continue to work Ruptly as much as possible.”

The page with the names of 26 high-ranking employees was removed from the website on Monday, but its archive has been preserved.

Toktosunova said that the company has the money to pay employees until the end of the year, and offered to translate them into Russian, if you run a business in Germany at some point it will be impossible.

“Everyone got sick or quit,” the Ruptly employee said.

The dismissals were another blow to the Russian international broadcasting network, which this year intended to launch a new German-language version of RT, for which, according to her, it was planned to hire about 200 employees.

Although job ads remain on RT’s website, the station was never allowed to start broadcasting in Germany: the authorities said that it did not have the necessary broadcasting license, and the Serbian license was not enough.