The researchers made a three-dimensional reconstruction of the face of a woman who lived during the Bronze Age. It is reported by Live Science.

Scientists have made a three-dimensional reconstruction of the face of a woman who was buried with a silver diadem in Spain during the Bronze Age. Earlier this year, researchers announced that they had found the remains of a woman and a man buried together in a huge ceramic vessel on the grounds of the ancient palace. The analysis showed that the man died several years earlier than the woman. After she passed away, her remains were laid next to him. Now, using a partial skull and tombstone decorations, a scientific illustrator has digitally recreated the woman’s face.

“The biggest problem with facial reconstruction was that the top of her skull was missing,” explains Joana Bruno, a freelance scientific illustrator who created digital reconstructions and collaborated with archaeologists at the Autonomous University. Barcelona in an interview with Live Science. “Fortunately, archaeologists have found the tiara and this gives an idea of ​​the size of her head.”

The personality of the woman in the tiara has intrigued scientists since archaeologists unearthed her remains in 2014. Her luxurious burial accessories – including a diadem, necklaces, silver rings, bracelets and earrings, as well as a silver-framed bracelet of excellent quality – indicate that this powerful woman had more power and was in a higher status than the man with whom she was found. This is indicated both by the fact that she lived much longer than him, and by the fact that she was buried with a huge amount of jewelry, scientists note.