The Court of Appeal of England and Wales upheld the appeal of the American side in the case of the extradition to the United States of the founder of WikiLeaks.

The U.S. Department of Justice is satisfied with the decision of the Court of Appeal of England and Wales, which supported the appeal of the American side in the case of the extradition to the United States of the founder of the WikiLeaks organization, Australian Julian Assange. This was reported on Friday by a representative of the department.

“We are pleased with this decision, we have no further comments,” he said in response to a request to comment on the court’s decision.

Earlier, the International Federation of Journalists condemned the London court’s decision to extradite Assange.

The verdict of the court

On Friday, the Court of Appeal of England and Wales upheld the appeal of the U.S. Department of Justice in the case of the extradition to the United States of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange. Now the case will be returned to the court of the first instance – Westminster Magistrates Court, which previously ruled that the 50-year-old Australian could not be extradited to the U.S. because of the risk of his suicide. The document also stipulates that the founder of WikiLeaks must remain in custody.

Assange’s fiancee Stella Morris promised to challenge the court’s decision, calling it “dangerous and unjustified”, as well as a “gross miscarriage of justice.”

Assange has been held in London’s Belmarsh prison since April 2019 after the Ecuadorian embassy in the British capital denied the journalist asylum, which had been granted to him for seven years. In January, the Westminster Magistrate’s Court refused to extradite Assange to the United States, where 18 criminal charges were brought against him, but at the same time did not release the journalist on bail while the appeal of the American prosecutor’s office was being considered.

In the United States, the founder of WikiLeaks, in particular, is charged with crimes related to the largest case of disclosure of classified information in American history. According to the totality of the charges, the WikiLeaks founder faces up to 175 years in prison.