According to the Navy Times newspaper, during the inspection, the completion dates of which are not specified, the navigation of U.S. military submarines will be temporarily suspended, but not all at once.

On Wednesday, the U.S. Navy began a large-scale inspection of the navigation systems of all submarines, which was the result of the incident with the American nuclear submarine USS Connecticut (Seawolf-class), which collided with an “unknown object” in the South China Sea on October 2. This was reported by the Navy Times newspaper on Thursday, citing a statement by the representative of the U.S. submarine forces, Paul Macapagal.

During the inspection, the completion dates of which are not specified, the navigation of U.S. military submarines will be temporarily suspended, but not all at once, Macapagal explained. Thus, the “activity of the submarine fleet” as a whole will continue, and the inspection itself, according to him, will be “short-term.” During these events, in accordance with the established order, the submarine crews will check the procedures for navigation planning, preparation, and conduct of operations, the risk management system, and the applicability of other preventive measures, the need for which was revealed by the incident with the USS Connecticut.

The corresponding order, as Macapagal told the publication, was sent to the submarine commanders by the commander of the submarine forces of the U.S. Navy, Vice Admiral William Houston. He refused to provide a copy of this order, citing the secrecy of some of its sections.

Although the investigation into the incident has not yet been completed, and the circumstances of the incident have not been made public, Houston made it clear that the causes of the incident have already been established and measures are being taken to learn lessons. “We adhere to very strict navigation safety procedures, and they [on the USS Connecticut] did not fully comply with the standards we adopted,” the publication quoted him as saying.